Culling Roosters

This post contains some graphic pictures of roosters, just a heads up!

We did it. We culled our roosters. It was sad. We did keep Sunny, and we also kept my Rock rooster, because he's so pretty. I hope he'll behave himself.


We had already killed one of the roosters a couple of weeks ago, to stop the fighting. Jeremy took the 22 out there, but it didn't kill the rooster right away. It was pretty upsetting to watch. Gideon made me a proud mama that day, though. I was holding the rooster by the legs, and got a little teary-eyed. Gideon took the rooster from me, and said, "it's ok Mama, I'm going to cry, too, when we kill Sunny." He has such a sweet heart.


Jeremy didn't want to try using the ax again, but we learned the 22 isn't the next best option. We tried the bucket method today, and it worked pretty well. Still sad. We prayed before we started, to have peace. Granddaddy came to help, and it was good to have him there. The kids and I caught the roosters. Jeremy and Granddaddy killed them, dunked them in hot water to make the feathers come off easily, and then cleaned them. Granddaddy showed how to singe the little pin hairs off the bodies, too. We couldn't ever catch the last one, and Jeremy had to use the 22 on it. We got all three, though.


There are many other posts elsewhere on how to kill chickens, (we've been reading them) so I don't want to go into those kinds of details. But I did want to write about what I'm thinking about this whole business.


I think our culture has lost an understanding of sacrifice. We don't know, any more, that the meat we eat had to die. We don't experience the sacrifice that we demand of animals. We aren't grateful for it, and we don't understand it.


We don't understand that a living thing must die in order for us to be nourished. I truly believe that before the Fall we were vegetarians, but after the Fall God made us dependent on animals, for nourishment and coverings. Adam and Eve lived in a garden and took care of the animals. Nothing had died yet; no one could really comprehend death. Then the Terrible happened. And I think it would have been easier on Adam and Eve to have died themselves that day. But instead, they had to watch their loving Father kill the animals they were in charge of keeping. And then they had to wear the animals to cover themselves.


By shielding our eyes from the sacrifices made by animals for ourselves, are we beginning to think we don't need sacrifice for life? If we don't need sacrifice, we don't need Jesus. And then we are in big trouble.


I'm not saying everyone needs to start killing their own chickens, but I do think God put it in place that we have to have sacrifice from others in order to live. And that ultimately points to Jesus. I was sad that the roosters had to die, even cried a little, but I needed their life to sustain my own.


And I need Jesus for the same reason.

17 comments

  1. We have two roosters we need to cull and even though I grew up in a family that did this regularly I'm dreading it. But I like your perspective on sacrifice.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I loved to read that you prayed before you started...we do the same thing. We always want to thank the Lord for the bounty he has provided for us.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree l00% with your perspective on sacrifice being needed. I too believe Adam and Eve were no doubt vegetarians before their sin in the garden. Their covering of fig leaves was not sufficient - God was teaching them an important lesson in their covering of skins - He required blood to be shed in order that sin be covered. A pointing forward to the Lord Jesus whose life would be willingly offered and shed to offer man's sin and the only means of forgiveness for those who seek it through Him. We too cull our roosters and old hens and this is a sad job but we look at it that our chickens have had a great life in being free range - running free catching bugs, enjoying the sunshine and just "being chickens" (not cooped up in commercial cages). So when their egg laying days are at an end or we have too many roosters, then their appointed end is accomplished with as less stress as we can provide - a quick but compassionate death.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Linda, that is what I was trying to say: sin has to be covered by the blood. We don't feel the horror of it when our hands aren't covered in blood. And we miss the seriousness of our sin and His forgiveness.Thank you.

      Delete
  4. I really liked your post. Thank you for sharing your experience and your heart.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I just wrote a blog post about our first butchering experience, so it was fitting to read this. I agree with you that our culture today doesn't understand the meaning of sacrifice. It is a shame, but I think blog posts like this help people see a bit more clearly. When we butchered (our first time) we started with an axe but ended with the old testament style (cutting jugular). It seemed more peaceful and I'm pretty sure we will do it that way from now on. Thank you for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's funny, how God really does know best, isn't it? I don't know how many times I've learned that, but maybe one day I'll go to His Word before I try my own hand.

      Delete
  6. Jennifer, what an eye-opening post for me to read...and your thoughts are poignant and thoughtful. Teaching high school, I definitely see on a daily basis that most students have zero idea of what sacrifice is, especially those sacrifices that provided their freedoms they so flippantly squander. I always enjoy reading your blogs...proud of all you are doing!

    ReplyDelete
  7. You have put into words my sentiments exactly. We fish and we hunt and while I don't like being around during the butchering I don't really get sad. But the thought of culling our older hens later this year makes me sad. But it's a good kind of sad and it's true to this life that we are living. My sister won't eat any venison or and has told us she won't eat the hens if we happen to serve them when she's here, but she has no problem buying boneless skinless chicken breasts at the store. Some how that is different. This idea that our choices have no impact on creation is a huge issue in our culture. Thanks for sharing with us at Simple Lives Thursday; hope to see you again this week.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great insights into sacrifice. I love the idea of being thankful for the life that is given for ours (whether it be animal life or The Life). I grew up around butchering and it doesn't bother me to be around it, although I've never had to do the actual killing myself. Maybe that will change when it's actually me doing it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Loving this post! It's totally my favorite for our weekly From the Farm Linkup! I really appreciate that you took the time to address any issue many folks would shy away from!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Important observations on the relationship our Ancestors had with the reality of sacrifice. Thanks so much for linking up to Awesome Life Friday. We'll be pinning this - we're looking forward to seeing what you have to share this week!

    ReplyDelete
  11. It's a tough job and I am so blessed that my oldest son (19) is willing to do this. Thanks for sharing this at Good Morning Mondays. Blessings

    ReplyDelete
  12. Krystyna and I are currently fighting over this post as our favorite for the From the Farm Hop feature. ;) Whoever wins, thanks for linking it up - it was a great read!

    ReplyDelete
  13. You gave a beautiful description of the matter, and I dare not say anything to take away from it. That being said, I LOVE your little guy's heart, and his compassion toward you. We haven't tried the bucket method, but maybe this year.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Much has been lost in our moving away from the land, and the dissociation from larger family (i.e. grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc.). The lack of understanding about service and sacrifice is a big one. Well written!

    ReplyDelete
  15. oooh I hear ya girl, same thing here, I try not to think too much about it. It's also the main reason why I am not giving names to my hens or roosters other than girl, roost, chick :)
    Just did a culling of 3 older hens and 2 meat birds I got from a class, never fun to do but you know where the meat is coming from and all good.
    By the way what is happening on your last picture, on the corner pillar and barbwire. Or is that your DIY culling cone?

    ReplyDelete


I have affiliate links on this blog! This means if you click on one and make a purchase, I will earn a commission. This does not affect the price of your purchase, but it is a wonderful way to support my family and me through this blog and to keep this blog up and running. So we thank you!